Archive for the ‘Delaware Schools’ Category

The Link Between Career/Technical Education and Student Success

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Investing in Education
It’s not just kids, parents, and teachers who feel the impact of our public schools. If you’re a citizen of Delaware, then you are—in one way or another—affected by our state’s education system. Check back regularly as we take a closer look at how When Students Succeed, We All Win.

 

Just one career and technical education course above the average can boost a student’s odds of graduating high school and enrolling in a two-year college, according to a study by the Fordham Institute. It can also lead to a higher likelihood of college enrollment, employment, and better wages.

So how are Delaware students accessing career and technical education courses?

Approximately 70 percent of Delaware students in grades nine through 12 take a CTE course. These classes are specifically sequenced and aligned to a specific career or industry. In recent years, Delaware Pathways has strengthened the sequencing of courses through the development of state-model pathways. These pathways provide students with high-quality education, training, and support services in high-demand areas in Delaware’s economy.

Students who complete a career pathway attain a high school diploma, earn an industry-recognized credential, certificate or license that holds value in the labor market, and a clear link to opportunities to complete an associate or bachelor’s degree program at a Delaware college or university. Currently, there are more than 6,000 students enrolled in 11 state-model programs of study.

We hope to continue to expand in the coming years to give students greater opportunities to prepare for college and career success. However, the greatest obstacle to developing a strong local workforce is a lack of systemic coordination across stakeholder groups. Delaware Pathways provides a platform for educators, institutions of higher education, policymakers, and business and community leaders to work together to improve opportunities for students.

There are plenty of ways to get involved in developing Delaware’s future workforce.

Delaware in the National Pathways Spotlight: 5 Takeaways

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Beatriz Ramirez, a student at William Penn High School, found her passion for cooking through the school’s career pathways program. Photos by Amadu Mansaray.

 

Last month, from up on stage at the Chase Center on the Riverfront, Beatriz Ramirez told her story.

Today a senior at William Penn High School, Beatriz originally came to the U.S. not speaking English as a first language. She felt isolated at school, and often didn’t connect to her lessons or her fellow students.  Until, that is, she discovered the school’s culinary arts program.

In the kitchen, Beatriz found her calling. With support from the chefs and instructors at William Penn, Beatriz is confident about her future. She’s combined her learnings from school with real-life experience, training under heralded chef Tom Hannum at Buckley’s Tavern. She’s already been accepted to Johnson & Wales University and the Culinary Institute of America—two of the country’s top culinary schools.

This is a powerful experience—and it’s one being shared by thousands of young people in Delaware. Beatriz and chef Hannum joined hundreds of state leaders last month at the Third Annual Delaware Pathways Conference. In the days leading up to the conference, the national Pathways to Prosperity Network held its institute in Wilmington, bringing together 150 representatives from 13 other states to our neck of the woods to talk about the tremendous progress we’ve seen here. In just three years Delaware Pathways has grown from 27 students to just under 6,000 in 11 career pathways and 38 high schools. While we have a ways to go, other states are now looking at Delaware as a national model, and are looking to learn from our success.

[Read: A Jolt of Blue-Collar Hope, The New York Times]

As someone who has worked to improve our schools for close to three decades, this is one of the most transformative and concrete efforts I have been involved with.

As I reflect on a week’s worth of celebrating postsecondary achievements for Delaware, here are five takeaways:

 

  • Delaware is a national leader – We heard from people across the country that Delaware is leading the pack in several areas, from scaling career pathways statewide; to creating and building partnerships across the K-12 system, private employers, and higher education; and braiding together funding streams to bolster our efforts. If we keep up our momentum, Delaware could become the first state in the country to get half of our high schoolers—20,000 by 2020—into a career pathway. [Read: Delaware Pathways Leading the Way, Jobs for the Future]
  • Inclusiveness and equity is critical – These pathways need to be open to all. We heard that young people with disabilities can be huge benefactors and contributors in this work, and there’s a strong push to do more there. Groups like the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Christiana Care Health System, Downstate Transition Services, Exceptional Children, and a host of local employers are already leading the way.
  • “College” doesn’t just mean a four-year degree—Shana Payne, director of Delaware’s Office of Higher Education, pointed out during her presentation of the Delaware College Success Report, that most of us think of “college” as the typical four-year undergraduate program, which simply isn’t and shouldn’t be the case for all students. We know that two-year, certificate and apprenticeship programs can be just as (if not more) impactful for preparing young people for the real world.
  • We have some work to do – We also learned from the College Success report that we’re still not preparing enough young people for college coursework, and it’s possible that we’re not providing enough access to AP, dual-enrollment, and other challenging courses to kids in high school, especially to students of color or students from low-income families.

  • The bandwagon is filling up, but there’s still plenty of ways to get involved—We saw at the student- and family-focused Pathways Expo that more than 250 students and families and 60 community organizations attended -are lining up to help students and partner with Pathways. More employers, parents and students are joining the ranks too. Visit delawarepathways.org to learn more about how you can get involved.

Legislative Hall Pass: Compulsory Education Bills Aim to Curb Dropouts

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Legislative Hall Pass
The Legislative Hall Pass is a new series at the Rodel blog. Our team of experts will examine the most pressing education bills and issues emerging from the 149th Delaware General Assembly, and weigh in with commentary, context, and data. Check out the Legislative Monitor for a full list of education-related legislation.

 

Discouraging drop-outs is a hot topic in Delaware this year, and one way that policymakers are seeking to accomplish this is by amending the state’s compulsory education lawthe law that defines the age range in which a student is required to attend school or some other equivalent education program.

Currently in Delaware, children are required to attend school from ages five to age 16, with exemptions available for medical reasons. In January, Governor Carney’s Transition Team Report recommended raising the required school attendance until age 18, and there are a number of bills introduced in the legislature with similar objectives.

 

Pending Legislation aimed at discouraging students from dropping out:

House Bill 17, introduced by Representative Dukes, would increase the compulsory school attendance age requirement from 16 to the age of 17.

House Bill 55, introduced by Representative Heffernan, would go a step further and increase the compulsory school attendance age requirement to 18 years old. This change would be phased-in over two years with a one-year interim period where the compulsory school attendance age would be 17 years old. The bill would also add the following exemptions: the child has received a high school diploma or a certificate of performance the child obtains permission to withdraw from school from their district superintendent or charter school board president

House Bill 23: Unlike the first two bills, this piece of legislation would not raise the compulsory education age requirement. Instead, it requires that any student over the age of 16 who wishes to leave school prior to graduation must obtain the written consent of the parent or guardian, and attend an exit interview where information is supplied regarding the likelihood of diminished earning potential and the increased likelihood of unemployment associated with dropping out. It would also direct the school to explore whether there are support services, interventions or programs that might assist the student in remaining enrolled.

Over the past decade, many states have considered increasing their compulsory education requirements as part of a comprehensive plan to boost graduation rates. About 25 other states have compulsory school attendance to 18.

Do compulsory education requirements work? Research, at best, shows insufficient evidence, yet recent studies conclude that raising the minimum dropout age as a standalone policy has insignificant effects on increasing graduation rates. Various interventions and retention policies, in combination with raising the minimum drop out age, are more effective in lowering dropout rates (See: U.S. Department of Education, Southern Regional Education Board, Brookings Institution).
 

What are other states doing to complement increasing the compulsory age requirement?

Limiting additional exemptions significantly from compulsory attendance, for example, only to students who demonstrate financial hardship and that a job is necessary to support their family.

Ensuring robust alternative options with sufficient quality and capacity to serve students. These could include alternative settings, intensive schools, dual credit, early college, technical, and online options.

Providing and requiring early intervention when students are off track, including mandatory credit recovery options and counseling for at-risk students.

Utilizing data systems to quickly identify when a student is at risk of dropping out, direct appropriate services (aka interventions), frequently monitor and adjust interventions.

We agree that increasing the percentage of kids completing high school and getting ready for careers should be a priority for the state. We believe the best way to address the root problem is not just to raise the compulsory age, but to create an educational experience that students find engaging and worth their time. At the same time, let’s arm our educators with the tools and data systems they need to intervene early when students are off track and provide at-risk students with tools to graduate such as counseling, credit recovery options, and robust alternative learning options.

Delaware’s high school graduation rate grew faster than any state in the nation in 2014, so we have some momentum. Some work underway to making school more engaging for students includes:

  • Personalized learning is growing in Delaware, utilizing technology and innovative teaching strategies to meet students where they are. From the BRINC districts to Design Lab to the Rodel Teacher Council, Delaware educators are pushing hard on student engagement and next-generation learning.
  • Career pathways connects students to potential careers in emerging fields like advanced manufacturing or IT—giving them a glimpse, as early as middle school—of life after graduation and real meaning to the lessons from class.
  • Social and emotional learning is also gaining traction in Delaware as schools focus more on creating compassionate cultures for students to feel safe, cared about, and engaged.

Legislative session resumes tomorrow. We will continue to blog about hot topics and monitor these bills and others. Check our Legislative Monitor for a list of all education bills.

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