Archive for the ‘Daily Education News’ Category

February 24, 2017

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The News Journal
Middletown school’s project getting headed for space
One of the most amazing feats humans have accomplished is going into space. But for a group of Everett Meredith Middle School students, sending bipeds to the moon was just the beginning. Come April, the seventh-graders will help break a new frontier … for fish. “Fathead minnows,” seventh-grader Olivia Court clarified. She and five of her classmates — Alivia Alessandrini, Kainat Azhar, Noah Keller and Moulai Nije — designed a project that will be launched into space this spring.

Rodel Blog
Early Learning is a better investment than the stock market
Blog post by Madeleine Bayard, vice president of policy and practice at the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
It’s not just kids, parents, and teachers who feel the impact of our public schools. If you’re a citizen of Delaware, then you are—in one way or another—affected by our state’s education system. Check back regularly as we take a closer look at how When Students Succeed, We All Win. Experts equate a $4-$9 return for every dollar spent on high-quality early learning programs for low-income children. But that’s just the beginning.

Liberty wiithin Limits: Personalizied learning in the Montessori Classroom
Blog post by Cheryl Lynn Jones, Montessori Elementary teacher at First State Montessori Academy
I am a second and third grade teacher at First State Montessori Academy in Wilmington. This is my 12th year in a Montessori classroom environment and my first year on the Rodel Teacher Council (RTC). When I first joined the RTC, I learned all about their Blueprint for Personalized Learning in Delaware and was amazed to see the extensiveness and thoughtfulness of the plan. I was also encouraged to see that Montessori education fits right into personalized learning.

Third-grade literacy’s enormous impact on life
Blog post by Madeleine Bayard, vice president of policy and practice at the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
It’s not just kids, parents, and teachers who feel the impact of our public schools. If you’re a citizen of Delaware, then you are—in one way or another—affected by our state’s education system. Check back regularly as we take a closer look at how When Students Succeed, We All Win. Third-grade literacy has an enormous impact on a child’s life. Research indicates that third grade is a critical turning point for students. A child who can read on grade level by third grade is four times more likely to graduate by age 19 than a child who does not read proficiently by that time.

Delaware State News
CR student wins state-level Doodle 4 Google competition
A surprise presentation awaited Caesar Rodney High School 12th-grader Kiara Florez when she showed up to her morning art class on Thursday. She’d been selected by Google as the Delaware winner of their Doodle 4 Google contest and Google representatives, her art teacher Rob Sample, fellow classmates, school district administrators, U.S. Sen. Chris Coons and state Rep. Lyndon Yearick were on hand to celebrate the win.

National News

CNSNews
DeVos slams ‘Education Establishment,’ touts school choice
The U.S. “education establishment has been blocking the doorway to reforms, fixes and improvements for a generation,” Education Secretary Betsy DeVos told the Conservative Political Action Conference on Thursday. And despite the $7 billion spent on school improvement grants during the Obama administration, the system is still failing too many children.

Charleston Gazette-Mail
Justice unveils education bill
West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice wants to eliminate an agency that reviews public schools and public school systems, nix the eight multi-county Regional Education Service Agencies, remove the mandate for schools to have 180 separate “instructional days” and erase the requirement that the School Building Authority consider “economies of scale” among the “objective criteria” for choosing which public school construction and renovation projects to fund.

Inside Higher Ed
AP participation is up
As access to Advanced Placement courses continues to grow, student success rates are also improving, according to the 2016 AP Program results for the class of 2016.  “The Advanced Placement Program has radically expanded access without compromising quality,” said David Coleman, president and CEO of College Board, which oversees the AP Program. “I think it’s transformed from what was once an elite program for some to what’s an available program for all.”

Chalkbeat
Memphis charter office seeks to double in size to keep up with growing sector
Shelby County Schools is about to double the size of its staff overseeing charter schools. About a year after a national consultant called the district’s oversight deficient, the school system is seeking to reorganize its team and hire more help. With 45 charter schools, Shelby County Schools is Tennessee’s largest charter authorizer but has only three people to watch over the sector — “lean for a portfolio of its size,” according to a report by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers, or NACSA.

February 23, 2017

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Delaware News

The News Journal
Help us recognize Career and Technical Education Month
Opinion by Victoria C. Gehrt superintendent of New Castle County Vocational-Technical School District
It’s a Monday, and 672 seniors from the four New Castle County Vo-Tech High Schools – Delcastle, Hodgson, Howard, and St. Georges – are heading to work at offices, labs, healthcare centers, restaurants, construction sites, auto dealerships and hundreds of other businesses as paid, credentialed, high-skilled employees. They have spent the last three years studying, practicing and learning skills in one of 40 different career programs of study, preparing to be career-ready all the while taking a full academic courseload and maintaining a GPA high enough to be considered eligible for a work placement.

Protesters rally at A.I. DuPont over season cancellation
A group of about 20 parents, students and supporters are at A.I. du Pont High School this morning protesting the principal’s decision to ban the boys basketball team from participating in the upcoming DIAA Boys Basketball Tournament.

Rodel Blog
Introducing the Legislative Hall Pass: Crunching the numbers on Delaware’s education budget
Blog post by Melissa Hopkins, director of external affairs and Neil Kirschling, program officer at the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
The Legislative Hall Pass is a new series at the Rodel blog. Our team of experts will examine the most pressing education bills and issues emerging from the 149th Delaware General Assembly, and weigh in with commentary, context, and data. With elections far off in the rearview mirror, inaugurations wrapped, and cabinet members trickling their way into position, the real work is set to begin in earnest for elected officials, and especially the 149th Delaware General Assembly.

The importance of employability skills
Blog post by Jermaine Williams, cooperative employment coordinator at St. Georges Technical High School and Rodel Teacher Council member
As the cooperative employment coordinator at St. Georges Technical High School, my job, in conjunction with our career and technical instructors, is to usher our senior students out into the working world as employed adults. It’s a tough job, especially considering that we have 254 seniors spread across 15 different career programs, which span from construction to automotive to business to early childhood to food service and nursing.

National News

Austin-American Statesman
Poll: Standardized tests won’t fix problems in Texas education
The most effective way to improve the state’s public school system is to cut standardized tests, according to the results of a new poll released by the Texas Tribune and the University of Texas on Wednesday. The internet survey of 1,200 registered voters, conducted Feb. 3-10, found that 21 percent of them believed that cutting tests was the most effective way to improve schools, followed closely by increasing funding to schools.

Komo News
Washington House passes education proposal
The House on Wednesday approved its education funding proposal, but majority Democrats haven’t yet decided how to pay for the plan, which has a price tag of more than $7 billion over the next four years. The bill ultimately passed on a 50-47 party line vote after lawmakers had to redo the vote because two Republicans initially accidentally vote in favor. The chamber’s action comes just weeks after the Republican-led Senate passed its own plan. Both sides will now need to negotiate a final compromise.

Education Week
Rhode Island announces statewide K-12 personalized learning push
Rhode Island is moving forward with a statewide personalized learning initiative that aims to support a variety of efforts to tailor education to the unique needs of each student. The $2 million public-private effort is being headed by Richard Culatta, the state’s chief innovation officer and the former director of the office of educational technology at the federal education department.

The News & Advance
Bedford County school board OKs $103M budget
The Bedford County School Board unanimously approved a $103 million 2017-18 budget Tuesday and will ask the county for $36 million in local funding. The proposed budget needs nearly $3 million more from the county than provided for in this school year’s budget. Of that, $2 million would be for operating funds.

Bristol Herald Courier
Digital learning embraced at Bristol Tennessee schools
Bristol Tennessee school students were hard at work on their laptops Wednesday — the day before schools across the nation promote Digital Learning Day. That’s because the system embraces the use of technology in classrooms every day — not just one day a year, according to Holston View Principal Kristie Coleman. Digital Learning Day started in February 2012 as a way for teachers to introduce their students to personalized learning using technology.

February 22, 2017

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Delaware News

Coastal Point
LB PTO holds Penny Wars to kick off sign fundraising
Lord Baltimore Elementary School students were able to do something a little unorthodox last week, as students were able to duct tape Assistant Principal Matthew Keller to a wall. The students had participated in “Penny Wars” for two weeks to help raise funds for a new school sign. “We had the grade levels compete against each other to bring in change — pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters. Some students even brought in bills,” said Jennifer Lovellette, president of the school’s PTO.

Rodel Blog
A wholehearted approach to learning
Blog post by Paul Herdman, president and ceo of the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
A few years ago, my fellow members of the Vision Coalition and I began reaching out to Delawareans. We wanted to hear what they thought a well-educated young person would need to know and be able to do in the year 2025. What we heard from more than 4,000 people was not surprising. People told us that better academics and improved test scores are important—being able to read and understand math would still be foundational. But they wanted more than that.

Digging Deeper: Are Delaware students safe and engaged?
Blog post by Shyanne Miller, policy associate at the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
Academic achievement is but one aspect of student success. To develop the “whole child” we must also nurture a student’s social and emotional skills. Research shows that a positive school climate impacts both academic achievement and the development of social and emotional skills. As recent concerns about school safety intensify, a stronger focus on school climate could help ensure that students remain safe and engaged.

National News

Chalkbeat
Indianapolis is experimenting with a new kind of teacher — and it’s transforming this school
A King County Superior Court judge ruled Friday that the plaintiffs in a lawsuit challenging Washington’s charter-school law didn’t demonstrate that charter schools are unconstitutional. Friday’s ruling is part of an ongoing legal battle over the constitutionality of Washington’s charter-school law. The lawsuit was filed by a coalition of parents, educators and civic groups.

Idaho Ed News
School funding committee wants to get back to work
The House Education Committee signed off on a resolution to put the Legislature’s interim school funding formula committee back to work this summer. House Education took action less than 24 hours after the funding formula committee delivered a report on its work from 2016, its first year in business. “That was kind of the easy part, that was bringing all the stakeholders together that was going out listening to the public and hearing what their issues were” said Sen. Chuck Winder, R-Boise, advocating for extending the committee’s work into 2017.

Seattle Times
King County judge rules state’s charter-school law is constitutional
A King County Superior Court judge ruled Friday that the plaintiffs in a lawsuit challenging Washington’s charter-school law didn’t demonstrate that charter schools are unconstitutional. Friday’s ruling is part of an ongoing legal battle over the constitutionality of Washington’s charter-school law. The lawsuit was filed by a coalition of parents, educators and civic groups. Coalition members haven’t decided whether they’ll appeal yet, said Rich Wood, spokesman for the Washington Education Association.

The Atlantic
Using historical fiction to connect past and present
Shanna Johnson, a middle-school language arts teacher in Grand Rapids, Michigan, had just begun teaching the historical-fiction novel Dragonwings when it took on added relevance during the 2016 presidential election. The book follows a young Chinese boy at the turn of the 20th century as he migrates to the United States to live with his father. The context of the story and its setting in San Francisco is the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the first major piece of U.S. legislation that restricted immigration and which, in targeting an ethnic group, set the precedent for subsequent restrictive immigration laws.

The New York Times
Have we lost sight of the promise of public schools?
In the days leading up to and after Betsy DeVos’s confirmation as secretary of education, a hashtag spread across Twitter: #publicschoolproud. Parents and teachers tweeted photos of their kids studying, performing, eating lunch together. People of all races tweeted about how public schools changed them, saved them, helped them succeed. The hashtag and storytelling was a rebuttal to DeVos, who called traditional public schools a “dead end” and who bankrolled efforts to pass reforms in Michigan, her home state that would funnel public funds in the form of vouchers into religious and privately operated schools and encouraged the proliferation of for-profit charter schools.

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