Archive for the ‘Daily Education News’ Category

May 26, 2017

Posted by

Delaware News

Delaware Public Media
Delaware school district consolidation, referendum changes headed to Dover
The state representative pushing a bill to allow local school boards to raise taxes without a referendum says it’s part of his plan to ensure education is properly funded into the future. The proposal from Rep. Earl Jaques (D-Glasgow) has been talked about for years – usually in a quiet corner of Leg Hall to avoid being overheard. The draft bill would allow districts to raise taxes up to three percent, or based on inflation every two years without going to the ballot box.

Town Square Delaware
Does Delaware really need so many school districts?
Commentary by Ron Russo, founding president of the Charter School of Wilmington and senior fellow with the Caesar Rodney Institute
When confronted with the suggestion of reducing the number of Delaware’s school districts to lower the state’s budget deficit of $400 million, Governor Carney and many legislators respond that there really is no cost saving in the reduction primarily due to the need to “level up” the various teacher salary scales. Delaware has 19 school districts, while New York City and Los Angeles have one each.

Coastal Point
Spanish Immersion safe for now
Some local elementary school parents rejoiced this week to learn that the Indian River School District isn’t canceling Spanish Immersion classes. The school board made no movement May 22 to change the program and then approved 117 applicants’ acceptance into the 2017-2018 Spanish Immersion kindergarten class. (They do not expect all of those children to accept the offer, which is why such a large number was accepted for four classes.) As the district anticipates budget cuts from the State, Spanish Immersion took its turn under the hot glare of consideration for potential cuts.

SMS reading teacher gives it her all
Meredith Wallace would rather do headstands in front of a classroom than give a newspaper interview. Then again, she would do anything for her students. That attitude helped make her Selbyville Middle School’s Teacher of the Year for 2017-2018. Wallace teaches seventh-grade English language arts. “I try to have fun. … I think that I’m silly. You have to be able to laugh at yourself for them to be able to laugh at themselves,” Wallace said. “Because when you struggle, that’s when you learn, so you have to show it’s OK to make mistakes and learning is fun.”

UDaily
Inspiring love of reading
Children’s Book Week, held in the first week of May, was established to reinforce a joy of reading in children. Now in its 98th year, this annual celebration encourages children and families from all 50 states to attend read aloud events at libraries, bookstores, and education settings. This year, the University of Delaware’s Delaware Institute for Excellence in Early Childhood (DIEEC) coordinated a statewide effort to provide reader volunteers at 40 early childcare centers in nearly 130 classrooms.

Sussex County Post
Hudson approved as Georgetown Middle School’s new principal
Indian River School District is promoting from within to fill the top administrative position at Georgetown Middle School. The IRSD board of education at its May 22 meeting approved the appointment of David Hudson as GMS’s new principal, effective July 1.

National News

EdSurge
Texas partners with BloomBoard to bring competency-based PD to the state
Competency-based education is gearing up for its shining moment in the Lone Star State. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) recently announced they’re partnering with BloomBoard, a competency-based professional development platform, to pilot six PD programs across the state. The pilot, which nearly 400 educators will participate in, is designed to provide teachers and school board members with the tools to demonstrate competency and acquire micro-credentials in the form of digital badges.

NPR
Preschool, a state-by-state update
More states than ever are providing publicly funded preschool. That’s according to a new report from the researchers at the National Institute for Early Education Research, or NIEER, who have been tracking state preschool policies and programs since 2002. In 2016, the report found, 43 states, plus the District of Columbia and Guam, provide publicly funded preschool. They serve about 1.5 million children across the country — mostly 3- and 4-year-olds.

The Hechinger Report
Yes ­­­– you absolutely can, in good conscience, cut the federal education budget
Opinion by Neal McCluskey, director of The Cato Institute’s Center for Educational Freedom
Release of the Trump administration’s education budget proposal, which would make about $9 billion in cuts, has been met with unfortunately predictable moral condemnation. Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, declared the budget proposal “manifestly cruel to kids.” President Obama’s second education secretary, John King, called it “an assault on the American dream” and said, “no one in good conscience could … say this budget makes sense for the interests of students and the long-term interest of the country.”

The Washington Post
A first in Maryland’s public schools: Students learn Korean
When Bob Huh’s students started the school year, most knew little Korean. But as the year winds down, Maerielle Batugo and others have learned the alphabet, memorized vocabulary words, formed sentences, read passages in books, and performed skits. With this, they are marking a first in Maryland. Their school — Eleanor Roosevelt High, in Greenbelt — has become the state’s first public school to offer courses in Korean, and their class is leading the way.

May 25, 2017

Posted by

Delaware News

Delaware State News
Bill would let school districts raise taxes with no referendum
Draft legislation in the General Assembly would let school districts raise property taxes without referendums. The bill, which has not yet been assigned a number, would enable school boards to increase taxes every two years by the percentage change in the federal Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers or by 3 percent. Such tax hikes could only be used to pay for operational costs and not construction.

Rodel Blog
Tribute to a global teacher
Blog post by Paul Herdman, president and ceo of the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
Last Friday, a friend and colleague, Lee Sing Kong, passed away from an apparent heart attack at the age of 65. See a story about his passing here. He was both a horticulturist and an educator. I knew him as the latter in his role as the director of the National Institute for Education (NIE). He was a master educator. He not only helped build Singapore’s system into one of the best in the world, but he was incredibly generous in sharing everything he was learning to help other educators and policymakers from around the globe improve their practice.

Digging Deeper: Student need grows as budgets shrink
Blog post by Shyanne Miller, policy associate at the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
Delaware’s budget crisis has taken quite a toll on education and the state as a whole. At the same time, student needs are growing, with some of our highest-need populations (low-income students, English learners, and students with disabilities) increasing at a faster rate than ever. With changing demographics and the expanding role of the public school system, students are going to need all the resources they can get.

The News Journal
Red Clay broke election rules on tax vote; funding system broken
A Chancery Court judge has ruled that the Red Clay Consolidated School District broke election rules when it successfully passed a voter referendum to raise property taxes last year, but he refused to invalidate the result, citing “dysfunction” in the state’s school funding system. “In this case, without a favorable vote, Red Clay faced a looming deficit. Prevailing in the Special Election was therefore crucial, and the Red Clay administrators were under a great deal of pressure to achieve that result,” wrote Vice Chancellor J. Travis Laster in an opinion issued Wednesday.

WDEL
Proposed education cuts concern Delaware residents at Governor Carney’s budget reset meeting
Education cuts are the main concern for many residents at Governor John Carney’s budget reset meeting.. With last night’s meeting within the Christina School District, where 77 positions have been impacted because of the budget, which is cutting $37 million from public education, residents are concerned about their children’s future.

National News

Education Week
Trump budget would slash education dept. spending, boost school choice
President Donald Trump’s full budget proposal for the U.S. Department of Education, released on Tuesday, includes big shifts in funding priorities and makes cuts to spending for teacher development, after-school enrichment, and career and technical education, while ramping up investments in school choice.  A $1 billion cash infusion for Title I’s services for needy children would be earmarked as grants designed to promote public school choice, instead of going out by traditional formulas to school districts.

DeVos, democrats wage war over budget cuts, students’ rights under vouchers
Democrats sparred with U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos about the budget proposal from President Donald Trump that would direct $1.4 billion to expand school choice and sharply questioning her commitment to protecting students with federal vouchers from discrimination during a House subcommittee hearing Tuesday. Meanwhile, Republicans questioned the education secretary more gently, focusing on special education and applauding the fiscal 2018 budget plan’s emphasis on new resources for school choice.

MinnPost
Minnesota standardized test scores have a new value. Here’s why it could pay to opt-in.
It’s too early to tell whether the opt-out rates for the number of students choosing not to take the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments (MCAs) in math, reading, and science are continuing to climb. That’s because this year’s test scores and participation rates won’t be released by the state Department of Education until later this summer. This lag time is often cited as one of the major critiques of the state standardized tests.

The Columbia County News Times
Students sign letters of intent for pursuing teaching careers
Two Columbia County High Schools recently took part in the first Georgia Future Educators Signing Day, an initiative through the Department of Education to encourage and bolster the pipeline of students into the education field. Over 20 students from Greenbrier and Evans high schools signed letters of intent to become teachers, having successfully completed their CTAE educational pathway course requirements.

The Hechinger Report
In this New Hampshire high school, internships shape the future of learning
Harrison Hicks, 16, sat at a small corner desk in the offices of Filtrine Manufacturing Company, a maker of water filtration equipment, drawing circles as his mentor, Josh Flagg, watched. In school, Harrison had just finished studying the circle in geometry. Now he listened intently as Flagg taught him how to use a circle to calculate the angle of a filtration part, which was then going to be manufactured on site.

May 24, 2017

Posted by

Delaware News

Cape Gazette
Mariner student Emadah White wins technology state championship
Emadah White, an eighth-grader at Mariner Middle School, won the state championship title at the recent Delaware State Technology Student Association Competition. All students were asked to create a car out of a wood balsa block. The car had to adhere to strict weight and size guidelines in order to qualify.

Newsworks
Wilmington students creating glittering tile mural for elementary school lobby
A yearlong arts project at Stubbs Elementary School on Wilmington’s East Side is creating a lasting and glittering ceramic tile mosaic for the school lobby. The project, done in collaboration with the Creative Vision Factory, is truly ambitious — 3,500 unique designs mixed with pieces of mirror and broken contractor tiles. Arrayed in a snakeskin design, the mural will run the length of the hallway, a 9-by-60 foot stretch.

Wilmington kids left out in bill that expands Newark Charter preference zone
For the 16 years Newark Charter School has been in existence, the high-performing institution has given preference to students who live within five miles of the campus. Using that formula, the school has grown and thrived, and this year became a National Blue Ribbon School for the second time. It’s now Delaware’s biggest public school, with 2,330 students from kindergarten through 12th grade. Another 3,000 are on its waiting list.

Delaware 105.9
Sussex County schools could suffer under Gov. Carney’s budget cuts to education
Delaware schools could soon be hearing the word “cut” perhaps more times than on a movie set. $37 million would be cut from public education under Governor John Carney’s budget proposal for the next fiscal year. So how would this affect schools in Sussex County?

Rodel Blog
Tribute to a global teacher
Blog post by Paul Herdman, president and ceo of the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
Last Friday, a friend and colleague, Lee Sing Kong, passed away from an apparent heart attack at the age of 65. See a story about his passing here. He was both a horticulturist and an educator. I knew him as the latter in his role as the director of the National Institute for Education (NIE). He was a master educator. He not only helped build Singapore’s system into one of the best in the world, but he was incredibly generous in sharing everything he was learning to help other educators and policymakers from around the globe improve their practice.

Digging Deeper: Student need grows as budgets shrink
Blog post by Shyanne Miller, policy associate at the Rodel Foundation of Delaware
Delaware’s budget crisis has taken quite a toll on education and the state as a whole. At the same time, student needs are growing, with some of our highest-need populations (low-income students, English learners, and students with disabilities) increasing at a faster rate than ever. With changing demographics and the expanding role of the public school system, students are going to need all the resources they can get.

National News

Education Week
What are states doing about charter schools in their ESSA plans?
States so far are making little mention of charter schools in their federal Every Student Succeeds Act plans, instead lumping charter and traditional public schools together in accountability proposals, according to a new report. The Education Commission of the States this month released a policy brief, called Charter School Accountability Under ESSA, that examines how states and the District of Columbia are addressing charter schools in their plans to the U.S. Department of Education on the new federal law.

The Record-Courier
$6.37 billion K-12 education budget approved by Nevada Legislature
Lawmakers on Thursday gave tentative approval to a K-12 education budget totaling $6.37 billion over the biennium. Roughly half that total — $3.16 billion — is money directly from the state — a 7 percent, or $210 million, increase over the current budget. The rest of the money comes from the Local School Support Tax portion of the sales tax that’s expected to generate $2.75 billion in the coming two-year cycle and from the 25-cent property tax dedicated to K-12 that’s projected to generate some $451 million.

The Washington Post
Black parents use Civil War-era law to challenge Mississippi’s ‘inequitable’ schools
The Southern Poverty Law Center is using a novel legal argument in an attempt to address what it describes as gross inequities between public schools serving majority-white and majority-black populations in Mississippi. In a lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday, the organization alleges that poor academic outcomes for black students in Mississippi are a direct result of the state’s failure to live up to the terms of its readmission to the Union following the Civil War.

The 74 Million
The key to effective personalized learning: Rigorous content, standards, and experiences
My colleague and I recently visited a middle school science classroom. Students, outfitted with safety glasses, were organized into groups of three to four. The room was lively but not disorderly as each group worked on its own experiment. As we walked the perimeter of the room, we saw many of the hallmarks of a personalized learning classroom: Small groups worked independently; each worked on an activity that they had chosen; the teacher engaged with small groups of students.

Follow Us

We're social

Contact Us

For further info

CONTACT US